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dc.contributor.authorDenov, Myriam*
dc.contributor.authorRicard-Guay, Alexandra*
dc.contributor.editorSweetman, Carolineen
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-12T11:12:43Zen
dc.date.available2013-11-12T11:12:43Zen
dc.date.issued2013-11-12en
dc.identifier.issn1355-2074en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13552074.2013.846605en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/305234en
dc.descriptionScholarship on political violence and armed conflict has long been gender-blind. Often&nbsp;subsumed within the category of &lsquo;children&rsquo; (who are assumed to be male in the context&nbsp;of soldiery), girl soldiers have been subjected to a double invisibility. However, in the&nbsp;last decade the literature dedicated to the topic of girls within armed groups has grown.&nbsp;We now have a much clearer understanding of girls&rsquo; strengths and challenges, and&nbsp;clear evidence of their overall marginalisation both during wartime violence and&nbsp;following demobilisation. What is now needed is to implement what we have learnt, to&nbsp;support girls in the aftermath of violence, particularly in the long term. This article&nbsp;seeks to provide an overview of what is known about girl soldiers. It explores their entry&nbsp;into armed groups, and their multiple roles and wartime experiences, as well as their&nbsp;experiences of demobilisation and reintegration. To support the points raised, we&nbsp;highlight the voices and experiences of nine former girl soldiers from Colombia, and&nbsp;eight former girl soldiers from Sierra Leone, who were interviewed in 2010 and 2011.&nbsp;The realities of girls affected by armed conflict vary in different contexts, yet there are&nbsp;similarities. Girls&rsquo; options, roles, power relations, both during conflict and following&nbsp;demobilisation, are embedded within broader gendered power structures and identities. This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis. For the full table of contents for this and previous issues of this journal, please visit the <a href="http://www.genderanddevelopment.org">Gender and Development</a> website.en
dc.format.extent15en
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/girl-soldiers-towards-a-gendered-understanding-of-wartime-recruitment-participa-305234
dc.subjectConflict and disasters
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleGirl soldiers: towards a gendered understanding of wartime recruitment, participation, and demobilisationen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9221en
dc.identifier.journalGender & Developmenten
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryAngolaen
oxfam.subject.countryColombiaen
oxfam.subject.countryThe Democratic Republic of Congoen
oxfam.subject.countryLiberiaen
oxfam.subject.countryMozambiqueen
oxfam.subject.countrySierra Leoneen
oxfam.subject.countryUgandaen
oxfam.subject.keywordConflict
oxfam.subject.keywordGirl soldiers
oxfam.subject.keywordReintegration
oxfam.subject.keywordAgency
oxfam.subject.keywordArmed conflict
oxfam.subject.keywordGender and Development Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordGaD
prism.issuenameConflict and violenceen
prism.number3en
prism.volume21en
dc.year.issuedate2013en


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