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dc.contributor.authorSlater, Jon*
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T12:21:21Zen
dc.date.available2013-01-21T12:21:21Zen
dc.date.issued2013-01-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/266321
dc.descriptionAn explosion in extreme wealth and income is exacerbating inequality and hindering the world's ability to tackle poverty. The $240 billion net income in 2012 of the richest 100 billionaires would be enough to end extreme poverty four times over, according to this Oxfam media briefing. It calls on world leaders to curb today's income extremes and commit to reducing inequality to at least 1990 levels. Jeremy Hobbs, Executive Director, Oxfam International, said: 'We can no longer pretend that the creation of wealth for a few will inevitably benefit the many - too often the reverse is true. Concentration of resources in the hands of the top one per cent depresses economic activity and makes life harder for everyone else - particularly those at the bottom of the economic ladder.'en_US
dc.format.extent5en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherOxfam Internationalen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/the-cost-of-inequality-how-wealth-and-income-extremes-hurt-us-all-266321
dc.subjectGovernance and citizenship
dc.subjectInequality
dc.titleThe Cost of Inequality: How wealth and income extremes hurt us allen_US
dc.typeMedia briefingen_US
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use. Can be shared outside Oxfam.en_US
oxfam.subject.keyword
oxfam.subject.keywordMediaen_US
oxfam.subject.keywordTaxationen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-17T00:22:44Z


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