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dc.contributor.authorRaworth, Kate
dc.contributor.authorNarayan, Swati
dc.contributor.authorSweetman, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorRowlands, Jo
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Adrienne
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-21T15:11:34Zen
dc.date.available2012-11-21T15:11:34Zen
dc.date.issued2012-11-22
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78077-218-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/252993
dc.description<p>Semi-structured interviews are a widely used technique in development research. Unlike formal interviews, which follow a rigid format of set questions, semi-structured interviews focus on specific themes but cover them in a conversational style. They are often the best way for learning about the motivations behind people&rsquo;s choices and behaviour, their attitudes and beliefs, and the impacts on their lives of specific policies or events. And they often provide valuable information that wasn&rsquo;t anticipated by the researcher. Whether you are interviewing a ministry official, a farm worker, or a head teacher, there are tips and techniques for getting the most from the conversation.</p>en_US
dc.format.extent6en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoSpanishen_US
dc.publisherOxfam GBen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOxfam Research Guidelinesen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/conducting-semi-structured-interviews-252993
dc.subjectApproach and methodologyen_US
dc.titleConducting Semi-structured Interviewsen_US
dc.typeGuidelines and toolkitsen_US
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use. Can be shared outside Oxfamen_US
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methodsen_US
oxfam.subject.keywordTrainingen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-16T19:21:36Z


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