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dc.contributor.authorDolan, Catherine*
dc.contributor.editorSweetman, Carolineen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T10:09:37Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T10:09:37Zen
dc.date.issued1999-03-01en
dc.identifier.issn1355-2074en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/741922937en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/131379en
dc.descriptionThe introduction of new export crops in the early 1990s upset the customary division of labour between men and women in Meru District, Kenya, and led to conflict over land, labour, and income. Women's workload increased; their earnings did not. They responded by turning to 'born-again' Christianity for support, and by resorting to traditional witchcraft to regain control. This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis. For the full table of contents for this and previous issues of this journal, please visit the <a href="http://www.genderanddevelopment.org">Gender and Development</a> website.en
dc.format.extent8en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/conflict-and-compliance-christianity-and-the-occult-in-horticultural-exporting-131379
dc.subjectFood and livelihoods
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleConflict and compliance: Christianity and the occult in horticultural exportingen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9221en
dc.identifier.journalGender & Developmenten
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryKenyaen
oxfam.subject.keywordAgriculture
oxfam.subject.keywordLabour standards
oxfam.subject.keywordGender and Development Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordGaD
prism.issuenameGender, Religion and Spiritualityen
prism.number1en
prism.volume7en
dc.year.issuedate1999en


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