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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Sheelaghen
dc.contributor.editorSweetman, Carolineen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T10:07:36Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T10:07:36Zen
dc.date.issued1995-02-01en
dc.identifier.issn1355-2074en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/741921768
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/131276en
dc.descriptionIn Zimbabwe, domestic violence is widespread, accepted, and reinforced by police and legal systems. The Musara Project seeks to change this, and is taking a radicalised approach by challenging patriarchy directly through gender workshops. Before, it ran public education campaigns and built relations with the Zimbabwe Republic Police, in addition to offering shelters and counselling to abused women. Now, Musara is challenging land ownership and lobola, or bridewealth, that makes a woman her husband's property. Stewart analyses why the project is adopting this more radical approach, that includes changes in leadership. This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis. For the full table of contents for this and previous issues of this journal, please visit the <a href="http://www.genderanddevelopment.org">Gender and Development</a> website.en
dc.format.extent6en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/working-with-a-radical-agenda-the-musasa-project-zimbabwe-131276
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleWorking with a radical agenda the Musasa project, Zimbabween
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9221en
dc.identifier.journalGender & Developmenten
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryZimbabween
oxfam.subject.keywordGender-based violence
oxfam.subject.keywordLand rights
oxfam.subject.keywordGender and Development Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordGaD
prism.issuenameWomen and Cultureen
prism.number1en
prism.volume3en


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