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dc.contributor.authorOketch, Moses*
dc.contributor.authorNgware, Moses*
dc.contributor.editorRose, Paulineen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T10:05:07Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T10:05:07Zen
dc.date.issued2010-06-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614521003763095en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/131158en
dc.descriptionThe Kenyan government introduced free primary education in 2003 in order to universalise access to primary education. Although the policy allows universal coverage, it ought to benefit the poor most as they are the ones who were excluded from the education sector before the policy was introduced. Using household-survey data collected in Nairobi, this contribution assesses the impact of the policy on schooling outcomes of the poor. The findings reveal that the free primary-education policy in Kenya still excludes the poorest of the poor.en
dc.format.extent8en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/free-primary-education-still-excludes-the-poorest-of-the-poor-in-urban-kenya-131158
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.subjectEducation
dc.titleFree primary education still excludes the poorest of the poor in urban Kenyaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryKenyaen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordSocial protection
prism.issuenameAchieving Education for All through Public-Private Partnerships?en
prism.number4 & 5en
prism.volume20en
dc.year.issuedate2010en


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