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dc.contributor.authorManyozo, Linje*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T10:03:54Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T10:03:54Zen
dc.date.issued2010-04-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614520903564231en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/131103en
dc.descriptionThere is a certain kind of thinking prevailing among Western thinkers which sacrifices rich narratives for theory. Theory becomes a prison, limiting knowledge production to references to (largely Western) scholarship. However, theory is not inaccessible: theory is coherent, theory is liberating, theory is narrative, it is everyday. This post-colonist auto-ethnographic morality uses personal experiences as a theoretical tool for explaining that in development thinking the 'experts' are morally and ideologically distant from local people, knowledge, and places, and hence they are illegitimate representatives who should never be consulted in the first place.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent5en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/the-day-development-dies-131103
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleThe day development diesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number2en
prism.volume20en


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