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dc.contributor.authorRoche, Chris*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T10:02:50Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T10:02:50Zen
dc.date.issued2009-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614520903220818en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/131051en
dc.descriptionOxfam's experience suggests that 'bottom-up' accountability can be an important mechanism whereby men and women living in poverty can hold others to account. The first section of this article illustrates this with two examples of Oxfam experience in Vietnam and Sri Lanka. The second section draws out some of the lessons from these examples and attempts to situate them within the broader debate about approaches to accountability. In the third section some suggestions are put forward about what would need to change if active citizenship and 'speaking truth to power' were to become the renewed focus of accountability.en
dc.format.extent14en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/oxfam-australias-experience-of-bottom-up-accountability-131051
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleOxfam Australia's experience of 'bottom-up' accountabilityen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryViet Namen
oxfam.subject.countrySri Lankaen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
prism.number8en
prism.volume19en
dc.year.issuedate2009en


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