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dc.contributor.authorPinder, Sherrow O*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T10:01:47Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T10:01:47Zen
dc.date.issued2009-03-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614520802689485en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/131001en
dc.descriptionThis article examines the role of free-trade agreements that integrate profoundly asymmetrical economies in simultaneously benefiting the more powerful nation and exacerbating inequalities within and between the countries involved. The latest in a series of such agreements in the Americas, the Dominican Republic and Central America Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA), opens up the economies of these small nations to US investment and exports, as multinational companies are able to take advantage of lower production costs and weak labour legislation. In the global economy, South-South trade agreements offer a far better alternative for countries with weak institutions and little economic or political leverage.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent5en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/the-dominican-republic-and-central-america-free-trade-agreement-with-the-usa-so-131001
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.subjectTrade
dc.titleThe Dominican Republic and Central America Free Trade Agreement with the USA: some concernsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryDominican Republicen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordTrade policy
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number2en
prism.volume19en
dc.year.issuedate2009en


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