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dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Jim*
dc.contributor.authorBrehony, Eamonn*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T10:01:43Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T10:01:43Zen
dc.date.issued2009-01-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614520802576377en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130997en
dc.descriptionEngaging with and assisting marginalised communities remains a major challenge for governments of developing countries, as many national development strategies tend in practice to further marginalise chronically poor communities. Development aid strategies, including poverty-reduction initiatives, have focused primarily on economic development. As a result they have contributed to the erosion of the asset base of these communities, and in particular their access to natural resources. While questioning the impact of aid arrangements on the poorest and most vulnerable communities in society, this article recognises that current aid arrangements, such as national poverty-reduction strategies, have created an environment in which chronic poverty can be addressed by national governments and other stakeholders. The authors emphasise the need for greater sensitivity in the processes of planning and managing national development strategies that seek to reduce poverty, as well as a commitment to institutional arrangements that include marginalised groups in the country's political economy.en
dc.format.extent9en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/are-current-aid-strategies-marginalising-the-already-marginalised-cases-from-ta-130997
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.subjectGovernance and citizenship
dc.titleAre current aid strategies marginalising the already marginalised? Cases from Tanzaniaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
prism.number1en
prism.volume19en
dc.year.issuedate2009en


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