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dc.contributor.authorSumner, Andrew*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:58:03Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:58:03Zen
dc.date.issued2006-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614520600958363en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130814en
dc.descriptionThis article is concerned with some initial reflections on the distinctive features of Development Studies (DS). The aim is to trigger further debate, rather than attempt 'closure'. Discussion of the nature of DS is timely because of the expansion of taught courses at various levels during the previous decade; because of sustained critiques of DS in recent years; and because DS has entered a period of introspection - illustrated by several journal special issues and events - to identify its defining characteristics. The author argues that DS is a worthwhile endeavour (how could a concern with reducing global poverty not be?), but the field of enquiry needs to think about how it addresses heterogeneity in the 'Third World(s)' and how it opens space for alternative 'voices'.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent7en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/what-is-development-studies-130814
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleWhat is Development Studies?en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number6en
prism.volume16en


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