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dc.contributor.authorShivji, Issa*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:54:42Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:54:42Zen
dc.date.issued2004-08-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0961452042000239832en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130646en
dc.descriptionNGOs and social activists run the risk of following the policy directions favoured by foreign donor agencies to the detriment of their own organisational and moral capacity to act in solidarity with those whose interests they claim to support. With specific reference to Tanzania, the author argues that while NGOs readily take action to protect their own interests, they do not consistently stand up for the basic freedoms of working people. In a unipolar era, which holds that the age of politics and international solidarity is over, it is vital for NGOs and other social activists to keep alive the belief that an alternative to the existing world is both necessary and possible.en
dc.format.extent7en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/reflections-on-ngos-in-tanzania-what-we-are-what-we-are-not-and-what-we-ought-t-130646
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleReflections on NGOs in Tanzania: what we are, what we are not, and what we ought to been
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryTanzaniaen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
prism.number5en
prism.volume14en


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