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dc.contributor.authorBrehony, Eamonn*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:50:44Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:50:44Zen
dc.date.issued2000-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614520020008823en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130436en
dc.descriptionThere is considerable focus nowadays on the involvement of communities in planning their own projects. Much of this involvement is in the form of verbal communication whereby villagers inform development workers of their problems and how they propose to solve them. Drawing on experience from two projects in Uganda and Ethiopia, this article argues that the starting point for any project planning in a community context is the current practice of that community. It is argued that if one looks at the community's practice, beliefs, and knowledge, one has a firmer foundation on which to build a project.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent12en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/whose-practice-counts-experiences-in-using-indigenous-health-practices-from-eth-130436
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleWhose practice counts? Experiences in using indigenous health practices from Ethiopia and Ugandaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryUgandaen
oxfam.subject.countryEthiopiaen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number5en
prism.volume10en


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