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dc.contributor.authorHamelink, Cees*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:48:15Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:48:15Zen
dc.date.issued1998-02-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614529854007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130306en
dc.descriptionMany governments and international organisations have offered utopian visions of a Global Information Infrastructure (GII), a successor to the Internet, which will enable global sharing and communication. The development of the GII rests on the capacity of all nations to have access to the requisite technology, and the currently widening gap between access to PCs and telephone lines does not bode well for the prospects of the envisioned network. The People's Communication Charter may provide a framework for critically assessing and influencing the quality and distribution of new information and communication technologies (ICTs) and their products.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent7en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/the-peoples-communication-charter-130306
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleThe People's Communication Charteren
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number1en
prism.volume8en


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