Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMackintosh, Anne*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:47:48Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:47:48Zen
dc.date.issued1997-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614529754297en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130281en
dc.descriptionThis paper explores some of the reasons for the failure of the international community to act decisively in pre-empting the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. These are rooted both in long-distant history and in the dynamics of post-Cold War international politics. Drawing on a decade of experience in Central Africa, the author looks critically at the widely accepted explanations of the genocide and its aftermath as `simply tribal fighting', and considers the role of external agents - journalists and aid agencies alike - in fostering this view. The paper ends with a reflection on the complex challenges posed by `reconciliation' in the wake of genocide.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent11en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/rwanda-beyond-ethnic-conflict-130281
dc.subjectHumanitarian
dc.subjectConflict and disasters
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleRwanda: beyond ethnic conflicten
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryRwandaen
oxfam.subject.keywordHumanitarian practice
oxfam.subject.keywordConflict
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordDisasters
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number4en
prism.volume7en
dc.year.issuedate1997en
dc.year.issuedate1997en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record