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dc.contributor.authorSharma, Shalendra*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:47:26Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:47:26Zen
dc.date.issued1997-08-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09614529754503en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130263en
dc.descriptionThis paper analyses the legacy of the 'green revolution' in rural India, going beyond the economic sphere to take into account the comprehensive impact of State-guided development strategies on the lives of ordinary people. Based on information collected during fieldwork in North India, it aims to provide a more finely differentiated picture of the nature and ramifications of the 'green revolution' in the countryside, as well as giving making suggestions for future policy reform. The first section situates the 'green revolution' strategy in the broader political economic context. The second (and more detailed) part addresses some of the contradictions the gap between increases in production and growing landlessness and rural poverty- with illustrations from a village case-study.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent9en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/agricultural-growth-and-trickle-down-reconsidered-evidence-from-rural-india-130263
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleAgricultural growth and 'trickle-down' reconsidered: evidence from rural Indiaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryIndiaen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordLand rights
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number3en
prism.volume7en


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