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dc.contributor.authorSchoonmaker Freudenberger, Karen*
dc.contributor.editorEade, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:44:55Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:44:55Zen
dc.date.issued1994-02-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/096145249100077461en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130140en
dc.descriptionThis article discusses the difficulties of reaching relatively poor populations with labour-saving technologies. Taking the case of milling and dehulling technologies in Senegal and The Gambia, it presents a simple analytic model that helps to explain why the vast majority of these labour-saving machines are under-utilised in rural areas. Though donors continue to support such projects widely, in few cases do they provide significant benefits to the broad population in the short term, and nor are they sustainable in the longer term. The key constraint is the lack of effective demand, owing to rural women's limited income-generating opportunities. In the time saved by using a machine to dehull or mill their coarse grains, they are unable to earn enough money even to pay the fees to use the machine, much less to earna surplus.en
dc.format.extent10en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/new-technology-for-rural-women-paradoxes-of-sustainability-130140
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.titleNew technology for rural women: Paradoxes of sustainabilityen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.countryGambiaen
oxfam.subject.countrySenegalen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordLabour standards
prism.number1en
prism.volume4en


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