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dc.contributor.authorSummerfield, Derek*
dc.contributor.editorPratt, Brianen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:43:59Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:43:59Zen
dc.date.issued1991-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/096145249100076351en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130090en
dc.descriptionIn current armed conflicts around the world, over 90 per cent of casualties are civilians. This article reviews medical and anthropological evidence of the psychosocial effects of extreme experiences such as torture, mutilation, rape, and the violent displacement of communities. The consequences for women and children are considered in particular. The author argues that the social development programmes of non-governmental development organisations should be extended to support social networks and institutions in areas of conflict, and ends by giving guidelines for mental health promoters working in traumatised communities.<p>This article is hosted by our co-publisher Taylor & Francis.</p>en
dc.format.extent15en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/the-psychosocial-effects-of-conflict-in-the-third-world-130090
dc.subjectConflict and disasters
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.subjectHealth
dc.titleThe psychosocial effects of conflict in the third worlden
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.keywordConflict
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordDisasters
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment in Practice Journal
oxfam.subject.keywordDiP
prism.number3en
prism.volume1en
dc.year.issuedate1991en
dc.year.issuedate1991en
dc.year.issuedate1991en


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