Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Jim*
dc.contributor.authorStorey, Andy*
dc.contributor.editorPratt, Brianen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-24T09:43:58Zen
dc.date.available2011-05-24T09:43:58Zen
dc.date.issued1991-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn0961-4524en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/096145249100076381en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/130089en
dc.descriptionThese Notes are based on research carried out as part of a World Bank/World Food Programme study into food aid in Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors use economic analyses to establish a framework for considering the cost-effectiveness of food aid compared to financial aid, and they apply this framework to the Wollaita food aid project. Food aid is shown to be less cost-effective than financial aid if the cost/benefit analysis is confined to monetary considerations. Problems arise when trying to quantify other variables that may affect the analysis, for example nutritional costs/benefits and increased/decreased production (the Wolliata project is a food-for-work (FFW) scheme).en
dc.format.extent8en
dc.format.mimetypePDFen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherOxfam GBen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/calculating-food-aid-cost-effectiveness-evidence-from-ethiopia-130089
dc.subjectApproach and methodology
dc.subjectFood and livelihoods
dc.titleCalculating food-aid cost-effectiveness: Evidence from Ethiopiaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-9213en
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment in Practiceen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
oxfam.subject.keywordDevelopment methods
oxfam.subject.keywordFood security
oxfam.subject.keywordWorld Bank and IMF
prism.number3en
prism.volume1en
dc.year.issuedate1991en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record