Measuring Unpaid Care Work in Household Surveys

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10546/620490
Title:
Measuring Unpaid Care Work in Household Surveys
Author(s):
Rost, Lucia
Editor(s):
Walsh, Martin
Publication date:
6-Jun-2018
Publisher(s):
Oxfam
Series:
Research in practice
Document type:
Research report
Description:

Caring for people and domestic work, such as cooking, cleaning and fetching water, is essential for personal wellbeing and survival. But across the world, care work is overwhelmingly done by women, which restricts their opportunities for education, employment, political engagement and leisure.

This research case study discusses the successes and challenges of the time use measurements used in Oxfam’s Household Care Surveys. The surveys, supported by Oxfam’s Women’s Economic Empowerment and Care (WE-Care) programme, aimed to measure adults’ and children’s time spent on unpaid care work and other factors that could influence this distribution within the household.

Pages:
8
DOI:
10.21201/2018.2616
ISBN:
978-1-78748-261-6
Document link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10546/620490
Additional Links:
http://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/measuring-unpaid-care-work-in-household-surveys-620490
Subject:
Approach and methodology
Keywords:
Inequality; Unpaid care; Women's economic empowerment; Women's economic empowerment; WE-Care; Household care survey
Status:
For public use – can be shared outside Oxfam

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleMeasuring Unpaid Care Work in Household Surveysen
dc.contributor.authorRost, Luciaen
dc.contributor.editorWalsh, Martinen
dc.date.issued2018-06-06-
dc.publisherOxfamen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesResearch in practiceen
dc.typeResearch reporten
dc.description<p>Caring for people and domestic work, such as cooking, cleaning and fetching water, is essential for personal wellbeing and survival. But across the world, care work is overwhelmingly done by women, which restricts their opportunities for education, employment, political engagement and leisure.</p> <p>This research case study discusses the successes and challenges of the time use measurements used in Oxfam&rsquo;s Household Care Surveys. The surveys, supported by Oxfam&rsquo;s <a href="https://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/our-work/gender-justice/womens-economic-empowerment/we-care">Women&rsquo;s Economic Empowerment and Care (WE-Care</a>) programme, aimed to measure adults&rsquo; and children&rsquo;s time spent on unpaid care work and other factors that could influence this distribution within the household.</p>en
dc.format.extent8en
dc.identifier.doi10.21201/2018.2616-
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78748-261-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10546/620490-
dc.relation.urlhttp://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications/measuring-unpaid-care-work-in-household-surveys-620490-
dc.subjectApproach and methodologyen
oxfam.subject.keywordInequalityen
oxfam.subject.keywordUnpaid careen
oxfam.subject.keywordWomen's economic empowermenten
oxfam.subject.keywordWomen's economic empowermenten
oxfam.subject.keywordWE-Careen
oxfam.subject.keywordHousehold care surveyen
oxfam.signoff.statusFor public use – can be shared outside Oxfamen
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